DIY Eternal Dryer Balls

Hello friends! I hope you are all starting to thaw out a bit. Yesterday, temperatures in some states went all the way up to 35 degrees! Whoo hoo!! In Minnesota, that’s swimming weather! It hit almost 60 degrees here in Southwestern Illinois. My hubby suggested blowing warm air onto my phone, so the weather app would show 60 degrees. I told him I was too smart for that, thank you. (I have a history of doing goofy things, so he tries to zing me when he can. Several years ago, the news reports were saying how the price of stamps was going up three cents. So, I bought about a hundred stamps at the old price, thinking, “Yeah, buddy. Going to get over on the Postal Service.” I showed my husband a few days later, the huge roll of stamps I had, thinking, I saved him money. He smacked his forehead and tried explaining to me that now I needed to buy 3 cent stamps. I didn’t believe him. I insisted the Postal System HAS to honor the stamps at the old price. It wasn’t until I questioned the mailman that I discovered I wasn’t saving anything. HOWEVER…I have spoken to a few folks, since then and they laughed…then mumbled they or their spouse is guilty of doing the same thing.) Anyway, my hubby isn’t sure just how far my knuckleheadedness runs, so he tries different ways, to zap me.

Anyway, since yesterday was such a nice day, I did a few loads of laundry and hung them outside on the clothesline to dry. I usually dry everything except my husband’s dark shirts or pants on the clothesline, and socks. Socks, after washing, I toss into the dryer, but do not turn it on. I will hang up the clothes outside; hubby’s dark clothes go into the dryer (still leaving it off) and after the stuff outside is dry, I toss the outside dried items into the dryer with the damp clothes for 15 minutes or so. I do this to kill any wasps that may be hiding in the clothes (about 15 years ago, I asked my husband for a dryer. We had just moved to this house from living in Germany, so I was used to having one. Don bought me a clothesline and put it up instead. I hung up clothes all summer and autumn with no problem, always shaking the clothes thoroughly after taking them down, before they went into the basket. Then one day, after several weeks of near freezing temperatures, the temperature was close to 60 degrees. I hung Don’s dungarees and other stuff outside to dry. When I brought them in, Don grabbed a pair of pants and put them on. He started yelling and smacking his leg, trying to get the pants back off. He finally got disentangled and out fell a wasp that was about an inch and a half long. He had three or four stings on his leg. That night, we went to Home Depot and bought a dryer.) and fluff the clothes up a bit. The socks and pants dry relatively quickly. The dress shirts I hang up while still slightly damp on a pole in the laundry room, until they are ironed out. Little things like this help us to save money. A few nickels here and there may not sound like much, but in the end, it DOES add up. Hanging up clothes slightly damp, so they can air dry also means less wear and tear on the clothing itself; if you iron it while still damp, it irons much easier, as well. I wash my curtains on gentle and hang them up damp. It saves them from being eaten up in the dryer and also often, ironing for them is not needed. The creases from the washing machine are eased out, as it dries.

So, after washing the clothes, I hung them outside to dry. Since they didn’t finish drying completely, I tossed them into the dryer. I don’t use dryer sheets, anymore. Actually, I stopped using them when my kids were infants. Dryer sheets and fabric softener should NEVER be used on infants’ or children’s’ clothing. Their clothing has a flame retardant chemical already on them, which if Heaven forbid, your child is near a fire, their clothes won’t go up in flames. Even if you choose to not use my method, PLEASE, don’t use fabric softener on your child’s clothing.

I hang my clothes up to dry whenever I can. But some of my readers may live in an area with HOA restrictions against clotheslines, or severe weather prevents them from owning a clothesline. Perhaps you live in an apartment, or just don’t have the time needed to use a clothesline; whatever the reason, you are looking at your clothes dryer and wondering how can you dry your clothes quickly, so they will be soft, without using dryer sheets. You may think, “But the times I have forgotten to use the dryer sheet, I pulled my clothes out of the dryer in a huge lump. Socks were sticking to shirts; an old dryer sheet was peeking out from under my skirt.” The solution is easy.

Tennis anyone?

Yes, tennis balls. They can be purchased new from any discount store, three of them for under $3. They last FOREVER, too. A new box of Bounce dryer sheets runs you about $3 for maybe 50 loads. If you ask at your local high school, they may have a bunch they can give you for free; or you can scour the local tennis courts or rec hall. They do not have to be any special brand. They don’t even need to be new…just clean. If they are a bit smudged, just toss them into the washing machine with your next load of clothes, to wash them. Then, put your clothes into the dryer, throw two or three tennis balls into the dryer. Shut the door and turn it on. You may hear a bit of muted thumping, but it’s nowhere near as loud as when your teenaged son throws his wet and muddy sneakers into the dryer.

This cuts down on the time your clothes need to be in the dryer, as well as helps to fluff the clothing, but does it control static cling? No, but I have a solution for that as well.

Foil balls. Just regular aluminum foil, wadded up into a ball. So now you have your tennis balls in one hand and that’s good. You have your foil balls in the other hand and that’s good, as well. Sort of like you have milk chocolate in one hand and that’s nice. You have peanut butter in the other hand, and that’s good. Put them together and you have a delicious new combination! (Yes, I am addicted to Reece’s peanut butter cups.) So, by both of these items combined, you get rid of both static AND have fluffy clothes.

dryer ball step 1 Step 1: take a sheet of aluminum foil around 18 inches long, and lay the clean tennis ball on the foil. Wrap the foil around the tennis ball, as though you are wrapping a gift.

dryer ball step 2Step 2: Squeeze the tennis ball, so the foil is wrapped tightly around it, molded to the tennis ball. If you like, you can wrap the tennis ball in a second layer of foil, but I haven’t had any problem with using one layer. Put the clean, wet clothes into the dryer and toss the tennis balls on top. I generally use two or three tennis balls for a full load of laundry.

dryer ball step 3 Step 3: After a load of laundry, the foil in compressed onto the tennis ball from bumping around in the dryer. Your clothes are static-free and fluffy. These will last practically forever.

As a rule, make sure you always check pockets and close the zippers on pants, shirts and jackets. The one time you don’t check the pockets, will be the one time someone forgets a Chapstick in their pocket, or has a piece of bubble gum and then you have headaches, galore. (But, if you DO forget and find a Chapstick melted all over your clothes, check out my blog for a DIY degreaser.) Open zippers in the washing machine and dryer can wreak havoc by tearing up your clothes as they bounce around. If the foil gets torn on these, just re-wrap them in foil and you are good to go!

Have you done a nice thing for another person today? Held the door open for the person behind you? Gave a quarter to the person in the checkout line ahead of you, so they don’t have to break a dollar? Told a cashier to put the pennies in the “Take one, leave one” dish? Maybe go through your old sneakers that are still in decent shape and donated them to a local school in an underprivileged area? Many teens would love to run track, but they lack the proper footwear and don’t have the money to spend $100 on a decent pair of running shoes. An organization I support is called Shoe4Africa.org. This organization takes your old running shoes (they need to be in decent condition, please, not torn up and falling apart) and sends them to Africa where people can use them. The next time you go grocery shopping, toss a few cans of soup or canned vegetables in your wagon and donate them to your local food pantry. Help an elderly person whom you see struggling to get out of their car. When you see someone trying to reach an item on the top shelf and you can reach it, assist them. Tell a worker about a puddle you see in the aisle at the store. Park your car a few spaces further and let another get the spot closer to your building. Shake a veteran’s hand. Take your neighbor’s trash cans in from the driveway, after the trash company has been by. Buy the person behind you at the coffee counter a coffee. Don’t let this day go past, without making a total stranger smile.

Until we meet again, dear friends, I wish you a wonderful day. Peace!

Remember to follow me as I share some of my favorite ways to cut costs. Please leave a comment if you have a favorite way to dry clothes naturally or share your results with the tennis balls.

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2 thoughts on “DIY Eternal Dryer Balls

  1. We hung a long pipe in the basement, which I use to hang our clothes from, along with a few drying racks. We have a pellet stove in our basement, so everything dries really quickly. I have tried aluminum foil balls in the past and they did seem to work ok, but now I rarely use the dryer at all.

    1. We have a woodstove as well. I was hanging up my clothes to dry in the basement as well for the wet months. I use my dryer maybe a half-dozen times a month. We use wood pellets as well, but not for our woodstove. We have three cats, and rather than pay $12 for 30 pounds of clay cat litter that goes EVERYWHERE, we started using the wood pellets. It’s the same thing as sold at Petsmart, but cheaper. For one, woodstove pellets are in 40lb. bags for about $6. The woodstove pellets are larger in diameter, they also are not in tiny, broken pieces. The pine cat litter pellets at Petsmart is about $15 for 20lbs.

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