Gardening to save money Pt 2 (potatoes)

Hello, my friends! I hope you all are well. Hopefully most of us have seen a bit of green in our yard. Yesterday as I was raking, I saw a glimpse of yellow; it was a crocus that had bloomed. I have three that have bloomed, so SPRING IS HERE!! Sure, a winter storm is expected on Sunday, with snow and freezing rain, but I am not concerned. My plants are coming back to life!

First crocus of the year!
First crocus of the year!

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My tulips
My tulips

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I am moving a huge pile of leaves we had in the front yard, to our backyard garden. As I’d mentioned in an earlier posting, we “borrowed” the leaves from several neighbors (with their permission) and had a huge pile in the front for the kids (YumYum, Beaker and my hubby) to play around in. Nothing says “autumn” like a pile of leaves to jump in. Since we had the leaves from three different yards AND ours…well, that’s a lot of leaves. The leaves were crunched up as everyone played in them, then winter and the snow further crunched and composted them, so now I am getting these wet, decaying leaves to cover the garden area with. When we rototill the area, the leaves will be rototilled under the ground. Anyway, I’ve been preparing my list of possible veggies to grow and I’ve been asking hubby if we can grow potatoes. “No, they take up too much room and you can never find all of them. They also eat all of the nutrients.” Fine. No potatoes in the garden. However, what about in a cat food bag?

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cat food bags are woven strips of plastic...very strong.
cat food bags are woven strips of plastic…very strong.

I recently read that potatoes do suck a great deal of nutrients from the ground, and are prone to some diseases, like brown scab. Once you get some types of diseases in the ground, you may as well have salted the area, since you can never grow stuff there again. I would love to grow potatoes, but I am not willing to sacrifice my garden for them. Therefore, I am going to grow them in the plastic bags from my cat food.

I buy the large bags of cat food for my critters. The plastic bags are woven plastic strips…very strong. Now I have read how you can use black trash bags to grow potatoes in, but I think the bags would split open from the weight of the dirt; sticks poking it, etc. I know I have a hard time running to the trashcan outside with a large garbage bag. Also, it seems wasteful to me, to use up plastic garbage bags for this. If you have a pet or a friend who has a pet, ask for their empty plastic food bags. Burlap sacks can be used, feed bags, or any type of sack you have on hand. No sack? If you can get your hands on a few old tires, I have read you can use those. Lay the tire flat on the ground and fill the center with dirt and mulch. Put your seed potatoes in the center and cover. As the potato plant grows, you add another tire on top. Fill it with dirt and more seed potatoes. Keep going until they are four tires high. A word of caution: Numerous online forums state to use your potatoes from the grocery store that have sprouted eyes. I wouldn’t, personally, since those will often be infected with brown scab. Just go get seed potatoes from your store.

How to do it in a cat food bag? Well, first with a sharp pair of scissors, poke numerous holes in the bottom of the bag and about 1/3 of the way up the sides. Not a lot of holes and not huge ones; just to help with drainage. Next, bring the empty bag to the area you plan to grow them at. Do this first, so you don’t fill the bag up, then have to drag it to the area you plan to grow it. Add about six to eight inches of soil and some compost at the bottom of the bag. If using a 22 pound bag, use no more than 3 pieces of seed potato. That’s right…not ten or fifteen as some sites I’ve read stated. Potatoes are greedy little buggers. They will suck the nutrition from other potatoes, to feed themselves. If you get over-ambitious and plant 15 potato pieces in one 30-gallon garbage bag, as I’ve read stated on one particular site, then you will wind up with a handful of potatoes that are the size of a large marble. Just save your large feed bags, and plant two or maybe three PIECES per bag. Roll the bag down, about halfway. Put the dirt and compost in. Lay your seed potato on the six inches of dirt, the side with the most “eyes” or longest “eyes” facing up and gently cover with dirt, for a few inches. Water, but don’t make them soggy. As the plant grows, add more dirt and compost to cover most of the green plant, but leave an inch aboveground. Unroll the bag and continue to fill the bag until you reach about two inches from the top of the bag. Let the plant grow, flower and die off.After the plant itself has died off, dig up the potato, by cutting the sides of the bag and permit the potatoes to dry for a day.

I really want to try this. Several sites have said that potatoes can grow in just straw…no dirt, just straw. Since we have so many dry leaves, I’m going to attempt this with some organic potatoes in my cat food bags. Since beans fix nitrogen in the soil and potatoes drain the soil of nitrogen, I was trying to see if I could plant beans on top of the potato bag, but since the potato has to keep being buried, so it will branch out and create more potatoes, the bean plant would be buried. Bummer.

I will keep you all posted on how this turns out. I am new to much of this gardening, beyond growing tomatoes. On Long Island, where I grew up, many of our dads had a small crop of tomato plants growing in the backyard. Not a lot…maybe three or four plants. Just enough for making sandwiches with or a salad. Here, in Illinois, we are using a garden to offset our grocery bill and summer entertainment for the kids. If I am still unemployed throughout the summer, my kids won’t be attending summer camp, because we cannot afford it, but also, I’ll be home! Why send them away for someone else to watch them? The kids are very psyched up to have such a large garden and are looking rather closely in the grocery stores for vegetables they may like to grow for ourselves. This garden is turning into a learning opportunity for the kids, as well as myself and hubby. This also is bringing us closer, as we all work together, knowing we need each other’s help if we are to get this all done. My son is talking about making sandwiches and selling them with the jams I plan to make with the fruit from our fruit trees and from a local “pick-your-own” farm.

I have enclosed a link for a garden in a bucket, which I found. It looks easy enough and small enough, that even if you just have a fire escape, you can grow veggies for your salad. We have several cat litter buckets, which once the litter is used up, my kids store their blocks or toys in. To discover they can grow their own garden in…well, now that’s pretty nifty. Next week is spring break for my son. We will be gathering our materials then.

Do you have any ideas for small gardens? My family and I don’t spray for bugs, because my son, YumYum and I like to just pick the fruit (or veggie) wipe it off, pick off any bugs and eat it. For slug control (this may sound gross, but the kids loved it) I gave my son a cup. I picked several slugs off my iris plants and placed them into my cup and then poured beer over them to drown them. He and his little sister then carried their cups to me, as they picked the slugs off, and I put them into my cup. We did this each morning before they left for daycare and I went to work. It kept them busy for the last 20 minutes before we left; helped reduce the slug population and they learned about insect control without using dangerous chemicals. I also crushed my eggshells and threw them into the garden. The slugs don’t like to crawl over the eggshells and the birds ate the slugs and eggshells. We did that most of last summer, since the early mornings were so damp, the slugs were really multiplying. Such fun things my kids and I do for cheap entertainment!

Don’t let today pass by without doing something to bring hope to another person’s life. Give a dollar to the donation can at your local gas station; buy a pizza and ask that they deliver it to your local police station or fire station. Buy a dozen doughnuts or bagels and send it to your child’s school office. On a night that you aren’t busy with work, stop by your local library and read aloud a few popular children’s books and record it. Send the recording to your local children’s hospital for children. Buy a bag of dog or cat food and donate it to your local animal shelter. Short on funds? Then volunteer to be a socializer for the animals at the shelter. You get to play with the pets, walk them, feed them, cuddle with them and you don’t have to pay a dime for it. Spend a weekend volunteering at your local food pantry. Donate blood. Donate a smile. Give someone a reason to smile today. Until we meet again, my family and friends, I wish you peace.

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Starting seeds cheaply

Good morning friends! I am trying to find a post I made and published accidentally before it was finished; then I finished the post and somehow it was deleted. Not cool, Mr. Computer. Not cool at all!

Oh well. Tuesday here in southern Illinois was gorgeous. Really, really nice. Blue sky, temps in the mid-70’s and my little Beaker at my side. She stayed home from daycare, because she had a fever two days before and wasn’t sleeping well, because she was so congested. So for two days, she was my shadow. I know it’s a bit early to be starting seeds for the garden, but I’m hoping to get everything ready, so at the first hint of warmth, the seeds will have a head start on growing. Since the woodstove will be retired (hopefully) for the season, Beaker and I grabbed a bunch of the toilet paper tubes we had reserved for making DIY starter logs. (If you are curious about that, I put the link here for you: https://mommyjen365.wordpress.com/2014/02/20/diy-starter-logs-for-fireplaces-and-woodstoves/   ) So armed with our seed packets, tubes, roll of toilet paper, cardboard egg cartons and potting soil, we were ready.

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First, poke a hole in the bottom of each egg holder. Use a sharp pencil, or the pointed end of the scissors or a knife. Not a huge hole; just enough to aid water in draining and to help the roots expand easier. Separate the lid of the carton from the bottom. Put a few tablespoons of potting soil into each egg cup and shake it gently to level the dirt.

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For the toilet paper tubes, cut each one in half, so you have two short tubes.

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A large leaf can also be used in the tube. The idea is to make it easy for the growing plant to push through the bottom of the biodegradable tube.
A large leaf can also be used in the tube. The idea is to make it easy for the growing plant to push through the bottom of the biodegradable tube.

Take a single square of toilet paper and poke it into the tube, so it acts like a plug. Don’t wad it up; just lay the single square over the top of the tube opening, and gently use your finger to push it into the tube. You can also use a large leaf or a few pliable smaller leaves. Hold the tube in your palm with the toilet paper plug against your palm on the bottom and gently spoon soil into the tube, leaving approximately a half-inch space from the top.

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Put the tube into a sturdy container, standing up. I used the plastic containers I’ve saved from when I buy chopped meat. I wash it out thoroughly, scrape the clear plastic wrap from the top and use them for my garden. They are sturdy and free. Fill each tube, standing them up, so they support each other in the container. After filling with dirt, be careful when you transfer it to the container, from your hand, so the “plug” doesn’t fall out and your dirt spills out. Don’t pack the dirt in the tube, either. Just spoon it in, give a shake while supporting the bottom, and spoon in more soil.

Dollar store "under the bed" storage container is now a cheap, portable greenhouse.
Dollar store “under the bed” storage container is now a cheap, portable greenhouse.

I needed a greenhouse, but no way can we afford it, so at the dollar store I found a zip-up “under the bed” storage container for storing blankets or other junk. The item is collapsible, the sides and bottom are a cheap fiber, so excess water can drain out. The top is made of clear plastic. It’s perfect to use as a cheap, portable greenhouse. I used a few pots that were tall enough to hold the plastic off of the egg crates, in the corners.

I then put the seeds into the individual egg holders and toilet paper tubes. This year I am attempting to grow Roma tomatoes; Brandywine Pink tomatoes; jalapeno peppers; sweet peppers and mixed peppers. These all need individual containers, so I use the egg carton container bottoms and toilet paper tubes for these. In the lids, I cover it with potting soil (if the openings are large, you can lay a single square of toilet paper over the openings and cover it with dirt. Then scatter the seeds that you can use a flat for, like marigold seeds. Once you have your seeds planted the correct depth, and lightly covered with soil, support the bottom and press out any air pockets. On the end of the carton, make sure you write what the seeds are, date planted and approximate days until maturity. When I cut apart the lid from the bottom of the carton, I leave the tabs on, which are used to secure the carton shut. I write on the tab the information I need.

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Afterwards, use a garden house set to “mist” and give those seeds a good watering. Don’t dump water on it, because those seeds will just float up to the service and float off. Use a good heavy mist and water the containers. Wait a few minutes and mist heavily again. Wait a few minutes, which is giving the soil a chance to drink in the water and mist a third time.

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Once the seeds are nicely watered, zip up the top of the “greenhouse.” It’s handy to slide a board or several sturdy large pieces of cardboard underneath the entire greenhouse, after zipping it closed, to hold it steady as you transport it to the place you want it at. NOTE: If using cardboard, Don’t have the cardboard striations all going in the same direction. This means, alternate the striations. Use two or three pieces and alternate the direction, so they don’t all fold on each other, together. Supporting the bottom, carefully bring the greenhouse to the area you are using. Ensure it gets plenty of sun and is sheltered from wind and cold.

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Water the plants, with the hose set on mist, at least twice a day. Since the greenhouse is made of fiber, water will not collect in the bottom of it, and turn moldy or rot the seeds. The seedlings will emerge from the top, but the edges of the tube will protect the newly emerged seedlings from the top of the greenhouse.

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When the seedlings are ready to be planted in the soil, dig a hole slightly larger than the tube and plant the whole tube into the soil. (Do not plant the plastic container that you had the tubes standing in, of course.) The cardboard will disintegrate. The egg carton cups can be cut or pulled apart, to create a separate biodegradable pot, for each seedling. Again, just dig a hole and plant the entire egg cup. The cardboard will help protect the roots from the colder soil and will add nutrients to the soil. The flats can be planted as is; just dig a shallow trench and place the egg carton lid into the trench. After planting your seedlings, water them thoroughly, and protect them from any extreme temperatures. If a sudden frost should be possible, cut open several large, black garbage bags, place short stakes in the garden so the plastic doesn’t lay directly on the seedlings and break their delicate stems, and lay the garbage bag over the seedlings. Anchor the edges, so a breeze doesn’t blow the plastic back.

Congratulations, you have your garden ready for almost pennies!!!  You are using stuff from around the house that would normally go into the trash or recycling. The Jiffy cardboard pots cost about $4 for a dozen and then you have to pay more if you want the plastic “greenhouse.” For two dozen little pots, with the greenhouse, I’ve seen them selling for over $17. The ones we just made are free. You can buy a huge 20 pound bag of Miracle Gro potting soil for $4. The dollar store greenhouse fits more flower pots and can be hosed down, dried on the clothesline and stored for next year.

I’m looking at the junk mail we get and wondering if I can tear up the paper, soak it in water with added nutrients so it becomes a slimy mess, and then using small terra-cotta pots as a mold, “paper-mache” the pots with the slimy newspaper and let it dry, This way I am re-using newspaper and other paper and turning it into a biodegradable pot for larger plants that will go into the ground. Interesting thought…I will try this when we have a bunch of paper saved up; of course I will let you know if this was a great idea or a failure.

Smile at the bus driver when you get on board the bus. Give your little one an extra hug before they leave the house. Pack a surprise treat for your loved one, in their briefcase. Hold the door for the person behind you. Text or better yet, call a friend and just say hi. Wave to your mailperson; donate an old bedspread or comforter to the animal shelter. We all have problems and times we don’t want to smile or be happy. Try and be positive for the person next to you. We are all a gigantic family on this planet. Be good to one another. Until we meet next time, I wish you peace and happiness. Peace!!

Gardening to save money

Good morning, my friends! I hope all is well with you. I am looking out the front window at the snow and wondering if spring will ever arrive. I keep looking for a glimpse of the crocuses we have planted, but as of yet…still nothing.

The front of our house faces due west. In the winter, it means the winds and cold hit dead on and in the summer the killer sun beats down on the front brick facade and heats the bedroom and living room to unbearable temperatures, since we had no trees in the front yard. We had a sweet gum tree that produces these pompom balls which give nothing but sprained ankles from walking on them; bruises, when the lawnmower shoots one out at high speed and it nails you and roots that get into the foundation of your home, the sewer system etc. Basically, beyond shade, it doesn’t do much. After it clogged up and collapsed part of our sewer line and cost us a great deal of money, we cut down the tree, ground up the roots and put in a tulip and lily garden, in the front yard. The first summer after the tree was cut down was horrible. The living room, which has two ceiling to floor windows, was turned into an oven. The thermostat would be set for 70 degrees and the living room temp would remain at 90 deg or above, even with lined curtains drawn, until sunset. After two summers, we found native wild cherry tree saplings that a friend was digging up. We took these tiny saplings, which were about two feet tall and planted them in front of the windows. In three years, they grew taller than the front windows and shaded the windows. They are native to Illinois, so the extreme heat of summer, drought and cold winters don’t seem to faze the trees much. In six years, they have reached their full height, of about eighteen feet high. In the summer, the front windows are completely shaded.

Front windows facing due west. In the summer, the sun would turn the living room into an oven.
Front windows facing due west. In the summer, the sun would turn the living room into an oven.
Native cherry trees are on the left side of the picture. They completely shade the porch and front windows.
Native cherry trees are on the left side of the picture. They completely shade the porch and front windows.

So that leaves the bedroom and playroom window exposed. I’ve been trying to think of how to block the sun, yet not have the neighbors whine that it looks trashy. I also want to take advantage of the long hours of sunshine. Therefore, I am putting up some trellises and planting sugar snap peas on them. The trellis will support the bean vines, which will in turn block the sun; look pretty so the code enforcement guy doesn’t get a call, as well as provide food for my family. The sugar snap peas have a very shallow root system, so they won’t interfere with any plants I already have in the area.

I’ve been looking for vegetables that I buy often (either fresh, frozen or canned) which I can grow in my garden. I go through a lot of tomatoes, for sauce, salads, salsa and soup, so that will be a necessity. In the summer, purchasing tomatoes may be cheap at the grocery store, but in the winter, they can be expensive. Peppers of all types are another vegetable we go through a lot of. Those are two plants that I purchase the small one-inch pots of and plant them. Some plants, rather than purchase seeds or the PLANT, I buy the vegetable itself and grow my garden from that. Last year, I grew Romaine lettuce (from the bottom part of the stalk) cabbage (again, from the core) beets (from the tops of the beet plant.) Unfortunately, the intense heat of the summer killed the lettuce and cabbage worms got the cabbage. The beets were doing well, and then disappeared. There are several vegetables that you can grow from the scraps of the ones you already have purchased, just by planting the tops or the cores: lettuce, cabbage, beets, celery, leeks, scallions, bok choy, lemon grass and onions are just some of the vegetables. Many are container-friendly, so you can grow them in the garden as well as a container for winter use.

Pineapple plant growing from the top of a pineapple I ate last summer.
Pineapple plant growing from the top of a pineapple I ate last summer.
Another pineapple top from one we ate last summer.
Another pineapple top from one we ate last summer.

Pineapple are not an item that can be grown outside (unless you live in a tropical area, like Hawai’i) nor do they grow and produce with a year. Most vegetables grown from scraps will produce within that year. Pineapple, though are a labor of love. I won’t see any fruit for another two years, if ever…but they are a pretty plant, even if they don’t produce.

Celery can be grown from the root. Simply take the entire stalk and cut off about the bottom inch. Place the bottom part, root-side down in a shallow dish of water. Use just enough water to cover the roots of the plant and place in a sunny, warm window. Keep enough water in the dish to keep the roots covered and within a few days, roots will form and a few leaf shoots on top. Plant in the soil, leaving the new shoots exposed. Keep the soil moist, but not saturated. In a short time, it will re-generate itself. Cut off the outer stalks as you need them, but leave the plant intact. You can have fresh celery all summer long.

Onions can be grown the same way. Cut off the root end and put it, root-side down, into moist soil. Keep the soil moist, but not saturated and in a warm, sunny window. The onion will grow into a new bulb. Do not let the plant flower, so this way the leaves will put all of it’s energy into giving you a nice, fat bulb. Pull up the onion, cut off the bottom and re-plant. Garlic is also done this way. Plant a clove, root side down. Keep the soil moist; keep a flower from forming and in a month or so, by cutting back the shoots, you will have a nice, juicy bulb of garlic. During the summer, I will plant my garden outside, but in the winter months, when I long for growing plants and fresh veggies, I look no further than the front window.

Once the ground thaws…IF it ever thaws, the trellises with the beans and sugar snap peas will help to block the sun, which in turn will cut down on my air conditioning bill AND cut down on my grocery bill. I am looking at sunflowers, which I understand, can also be used as a trellis for beans, as long as the sunflowers are the mammoth type. By growing our own sunflower seeds, it will cut down on our birdseed bill as well. We already grow a patch of Rudbeckia which feed the goldfinch in the autumn. Every little bit helps, right?

Until next time, my friends, I hope someone has made you smile today. If not, then bring an extra smile to work or school, so you can share it: shake a veteran’s hand; bring a neighbor’s trash cans in, before they blow into the street; stop for the crazy squirrel who attempts to cross the street as you are coming; hold the door for the person behind you; grab a wagon you see moving in the parking lot, before it hits someone’s car; throw your bread crusts out for the birds or squirrels. We all need to help one another on this planet, whether we are tall or small; two legs, four legs or no legs…we live together on this planet, so let’s love one another like a family should.

organizing our house

Good morning, friends! I am sorry for not posting the past few days. There was a lot going on, between taking my husband to the hospital for being ill and dealing with two crazy kids. So glad to be able to sit down with you, enjoy a hot cup of tea and relax as we chat.

Today, I wanted to talk with you about organizing the house. Now don’t get me wrong; we all have days when we want to keep the curtains closed, lest a neighbor or door-to-door salesman get a glimpse of the extremely localized tornado that swept through our house. I’m not talking about those days; I am meaning everyday living. The main reason to keep your house in decent shape, besides, knowing where stuff is, not having to shove an unexpected guest out of the door, or telling your husband he can’t bring home his boss for dinner, but actually for safety reasons. At least once a week I read stories about elderly people who injure themselves and the emergency services were unable to bring in their stretcher, or were unable to locate the victim through the mounds of stuff. A scary thought: what if your home had an emergency? Can emergency crews easily gain access to all parts of your home? If a fire were to start, could you easily access all parts of the home to put out the little fire, before it turned into roaring, all-consuming flames?

So today, a little bit at a time, we are going to get our house in order. We aren’t going to take a whole weekend and do it, because most of us would get burned out by lunchtime on Saturday. So, a little nibble here, a little nibble there, a big old chomp another time and voila! The furnace repair guy can just show up, without our requesting 48 hours notice while we throw everything into huge Tupperware and hide it.

We can start with your choice of rooms, but it’s actually going to be 30 minutes per day for the main room we selected, and fifteen additional minutes for each other room. The average house has about five rooms, so about 90 minutes a day, TOTAL. Not all at once, but ten minutes in the morning before the kids get up for school; ten minutes while they eat breakfast (put your coffee in a “to go” mug and start the washing machine); fifteen minutes while they are changing out of their school clothes, after school; five minutes while they wash their hands before dinner; ten minutes while they fight over whose turn it is to clean the cat litterbox or walk the dog; ten minutes while the family gets ready for bed, and maybe the last fifteen minutes after the kids are in their room reading before bed. Get a small basket and get into the habit of carrying it around with you. As you travel, room to room throughout the day, items that you find that are in the wrong room, toss into the basket and carry it around until you reach the correct room and put it away. Warn the kids that if you see the same item three times out of it’s proper room, it’s gone for good, then carry through on the threat. My kids have been warned repeatedly that I don’t want toys on the kitchen table. Over and over, as they would reach for a toy, they would knock over their glass, or the toy would hit the corner of their plate, flipping the plate over and onto the floor. Now, when I find toys on the table, I just toss them into a black plastic garbage bag in my closet. When it is halfway full, pull it out and donate it to a charity. Don’t open the bag and peek what’s inside, or else you are liable to start pulling stuff out. Just realize that once it’s in “THE BLACK HOLE” it will never escape. Make it a point that for every item of clothing you purchase, you take three items out of your closet or drawer and donate it. Some friends like to have a trading game, in which they clean out their closets and kids’ toyboxes and swap those items with another friend for something else. That doesn’t really help to get RID of the clutter, but REPLACES the clutter. The purpose is to rid ourselves of it.

So today, I spent 15 minutes clearing the dishwasher and putting the dishes away and re-loading the dishwasher. I cleared off the table for ten minutes. I spent ten minutes wiping out the bathroom sink and sink counter; living room gets the tile floor swept and lightly mopped and putting everyone’s shoes into their bin. So, the living room received it’s fifteen minutes of attention and is done for today. I spent 10 minutes making the bed and clearing dirty tissues off the side of the nightstand, then five minutes pulling laundry to be washed out of the basket. Master bedroom is done. (This was while I was gabbing on the phone to a credit card company asking if due to being on time with my payments, they would reduce my APR.) Next I got the kids up and their breakfast was ready, while I pulled dirty laundry from their room. Break up an argument over who has more icing on their strudel, and back to bringing laundry down to the laundry room. Comfort my daughter, Beaker, when her brother, YumYum tells her that we are taking her back to the hospital and trade her in for a toddler that doesn’t cry as much, then back to cleaning. As I walk around, I see items and put them back into the places they belong. I wash, dry and put away three dishes as I wait for the water to boil for my tea. Put the tea in a “to-go mug and sip it as I run the sweeper in the kitchen. Little things like this can knock off a lot of housework. Before bed, I try to do the things that I didn’t manage for the day: run the washing machine if I have a full load; set the timer for the dishwasher if I have a full load; check my ice cube tray in the automatic cube maker. If the tray is full, I pull it out (I do this once a week) and dump the ice cubes into my planter trays. Overnight the ice melts and waters the plants. Wipe off the table and make sure the coffee pot is filled and ready. If I have run out of milk, I use the dried milk and make a half-gallon and let it chill overnight. I add a dash of vanilla, so no one recognizes it’s not regular milk. Reconstituted milk is much cheaper than regular milk; easy to keep and with a dash of vanilla, your family won’t know the difference.

When you look at a job you must do, you want to make it manageable, not overwhelming. If you open your mail near the recycling container, you can eliminate some paper clutter by preventing it from entering the house. Open the circulars (or don’t even open them. We are really tight for money right now, so I don’t open the circulars from K-Mart or other stores, because often I’ll want to run out and purchase stuff. Little things like this can make the jobs much easier on weekends.

I went to the dollar store and bought my kids their own small broom, foxtail and dustpan. They picked out their own and are responsible for it. Now, each morning, they know they are each responsible for sweeping up small messes. Beaker sweeps the dust bunnies that collect behind the bedroom door and Yums sweeps along the edge of the banister. When they finish those chores, they are allowed to throw a cup of birdseed out for the birds or put dry cat food out for the stray cat I feed, outside.

Most of all, when you have little ones helping, even if they make their bed sloppy, don’t go behind them and re-do it. By praising them, they will want to help more. How would you feel if you helped a co-worker file a bunch of papers and they pulled out all of the papers you did and re-filed them? Or if you helped them by putting a stack of invoices in order and they sighed loudly and said to another person, “Well, I guess I have to put this in order MYSELF?” Would you want to help that person again? But if you praise your child or spouse, “Awesome! I was getting ready to do that and you already finished it for me! You did it better than I could!” the child will be happy to help you with something else. Your partner or spouse will say, “Well, it wasn’t really hard and it didn’t take me long to do.” Organizing your house will show you where repairs need to be made on your house as well as help you repair any tiny fissures in your relationships by encouraging others.

Have you made someone smile today? Given a person a compliment? Told another driver to go, despite it being your turn, at the stop sign? Did you tell the barista at the coffee shop that she did your coffee, perfect? Did you greet a co-worker in the parking lot and hold the door open for them as you both walked in? Wave a dog-walker across the street he was attempting to cross? How about wave to a bunch of little kids looking out the back window of their schoolbus? What did you do, to make someone feel good about themselves today? Until next time, remember we are all living on this planet for a reason, whether we are tall or small. Peace!