Gardening to save money part 3

Good evening everyone! I hope everyone is doing well and enjoying that springtime has definitely decided to stay. Last Saturday night as I was looking out the window, I saw my first firefly! Yes, spring and warm weather is here!

We have most of our garden in the ground. This means the Roma tomatoes; red cabbage; beets; carrots; radishes; Parris Island Cos lettuce (Parris Island species, because Parris Island is where I was forged into a Marine! Ooh rah!!) and peas. The bush beans, pickling cucumbers and eggplant go in this weekend, as well as my jalapeno and sweet peppers. I just turned over another area, which will be for my pumpkins, the sugar pie kind. In containers, I have rhubarb; red cabbage; red, white and yellow onions (cabbage and onions were grown from stumps or cores) garlic (which I intend to preserve.) I will be sprinkling the seeds for my basil amongst my tomato plants and also marigold seeds. Basil is a companion plant to tomato plants.  Busy, busy, busy!

Potato barrel
Potato barrel
Potato barrel #2
Potato barrel #2
Potato barrel #3
Potato barrel #3
Potato barrel #4
Potato barrel #4
My potato barrels are actually old trashcans
My potato barrels are actually old trashcans

I am not an extremely talented person. My dad isn’t MacGyver and my mom wasn’t the Good Fairy Glenda. I learned all of these gardening things by reading and reading and checking out books, and reading, talking to people (especially ones from other countries, who have methods which aren’t often used here in the States, because it’s easier to do it the usual way.) Some of my methods I am learning as I go and they aren’t working. I adapt. We are on a severely limited income, so many of these ways, besides being fun, re-use items that would usually go into the trash. I love the challenge and to see that my way to get around the problem actually works…well, there is no better feeling. My kids love running to me, “Mommy! Here’s another toilet paper roll! We need it for the garden!” My kids love carrying the outer leaves from the lettuce heads, the carrot tops and cucumber ends from salads we make, in a huge bowl to throw in the compost heap. Old newspapers are laid out over the garden. Grass clippings from when hubby mows the grass, my kids sprinkle over the compost. The stand by and watch as I turn the whole mess over. (I do it the easy way: I use a manure fork and scoopful by scoopful, move it from one spot to another, about three feet away.) Sawdust from all of the wood we are cutting up for firewood is picked up and packed into small buckets for them to run back and forth: fill, run to the compost, sprinkle it, run back to the sawdust pile, re-fill. It’s a task they don’t get tired of.

Last weekend, noticing that my blueberry bush was looking a little reddish, I remembered that reddish leaves show that the soil lacks acid. So, I poured about a half-cup of white vinegar into about a gallon of water, and watered the bush. It looks a bit better now. Still reddish, but the leaves look a bit perkier.

Gardening is a tough job. It’s a labor of love. While everyone is watching television, or playing video games, we are outside pulling weeds; looking up bugs we find in the garden to see if the insect is a “keeper” or a “squasher.” We try to lure beneficial insects to the garden, because I don’t want to use any pesticides. I want to ask YumYum to go out and pick me ten tomatoes, and not worry if he devours two tomatoes, during his mission. I want to pull cherries off of the tree and let my little girl savor the tartness, without saying ” Ooh, no no. We have to wash these first.” I want to enjoy the fruits of our labor and if I have to share some with a few insects, so be it. But my kids are seeing that spraying is not always the answer, especially when insects are becoming more and more immune to the pesticides used, which means we need to develop stronger ones. No, not here. My kids watch me pull apart the tent caterpillar nest and dump the caterpillars into water with a squirt of Dawn dishwashing soap. (I use Dawn for my plants, because it’s environmentally safe.) They see and learn. Our greatest gift we can give our kids is a thirst and desire for learning.

What activity have you done with your child this week? Activity means “active” meaning “interacting” with your child. Play ball? Go for a walk? Pull weeds together? Did you perhaps cook dinner together, with you cooking at the stove while the child sets the table and just talk? How about walk around the house with a garbage bag and collect five items from each room to throw away or donate? They sound like little things, but to a child, they mean the world.

Container gardening
Container gardening
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