The Snap Pea Circus is in Town; Cucumbers in a Cage

Hello, friends! I’m sitting at my kitchen table, seeing how cloudy it is outside and occasionally stepping out to see how warm and humid it is. This past week was pretty brutal. The temps were in the 90’s and very humid. The sun baked all of the soaking wet dirt to a concrete-like hardness. Prior to last week, we’d been having high 70’s to low 80’s temps and rain almost every day or two. The sudden introduction to summer was a real shocker.

My pea plants, which were doing okay because of the nice cool weather were growing quite well. I put several bamboo poles up and strung cheap, brightly colored yarn between the poles, making a double-pass on the rows, so I could pinch the plants between the yarn and hold them upright. Peas are a cool-weather plant. The sudden thrust into summer practically broke their spirits. They were planted rather late, due to the weather and hubby’s work commitments. Then, the first planting of peas just…disappeared. Nothing grew, so we had to re-plant. Anyway, we finally have them growing, and flowering, but now we need to get them out of the direct sun and the heat. Thus, I broke out the brightly-colored party tablecloths I bought at the Dollar Tree. Remember when I used them to protect my fruit trees from that late frost in April? Well, I folded them neatly and stored them, in case they were needed again…and they were.

Pea plants and their trellises
Pea plants and their trellises
Homemade trellis for my pea plants
Homemade trellis for my pea plants

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I simply laid the bright tablecloths over the tops of the bamboo stakes and clothespinned them onto the poles.

 

pea plants with a sun canopy
pea plants with a sun canopy.

Looks like the circus is in town, doesn’t it?

The canopy is open at both ends that the wind is coming from, to allow a cooling breeze to pass under, yet keeps the peas out of the direct sun. I have it all the way to the ground on the western side, yet mostly open on the eastern side, to allow air flow.

Canopies are only partially open on the eastern side, as the sun is directly overhead.
Canopies are only partially open on the eastern side, as the sun is directly overhead.
Canopies are clothespinned on, so if it gets too windy, or a storm blows in, they can be quickly removed.
Canopies are clothespinned on, so if it gets too windy, or a storm blows in, they can be quickly removed.
open on the eastern side of the "tent"
open on the eastern side of the “tent”
Inside is still very well-lighted, but it's a diffused light
Inside is still very well-lighted, but it’s a diffused light
Plants look grateful to be out of the intense 90 degree sun
Plants look grateful to be out of the intense 90 degree sun

The tents allow for air flow, and light, yet not so much light as to burn the plants. I put the tent up over them around 10am, when the sun starts warming up. I let some of the dew that landed the night before, evaporate, prior to putting the canopy over them. The canopy stays up until about 4pm, when the sun is on the other side of the house and the peas are out of the direct light. On cloudy days, I leave the canopy off, of course.

Speaking of circus, my hubby and I planted a bunch of cucumbers. The plants have started to really spread, but I had promised him that if he let me plant cucumbers, I will keep them corralled. I had no idea how I would do it, but I figured I’ll figure something out…and I did.

My husband and I had those simple safety gates…you know the kind you put up in a doorway, then lower a ratchet-type bar in the center and the ends then tighten to block off the door? Well, my son at the age of two learned how to get through them, so we had to get a permanent gate; the type that attach to the wall. Since both of my kiddies have outgrown the gate, I needed something to do with them, as they were taking up space and getting in the way of everything.

Last week, I pulled the gates out of the garage, separated each section and turned the gate sideways. The gate had vertical bars, so I turned it sideways, creating horizontal bars and zip-tied the corners.

Come see the ferocious garden-choking cucumbers in a cage.
Come see the ferocious garden-choking cucumbers in a cage.

I zip-tied three of the corners and left the fourth corner open and used a piece of aluminum wire, which I twisted into an “S-” shape to use as a latch.

My cucumber cage's latch
My cucumber cage’s latch

The latch makes it easier to get in and out of the cage, to help the leaves latch onto the sides of the cage, or to pick the cucumbers, when it is time.

Happy cucumbers.
Happy cucumbers.

Any type of old safety gate can be used, or even if you have an old crib, which is no longer being used, or maybe a wire bed frame. Just make sure it is put up, so it will be stable. If it falls when someone leans on it, then it isn’t safe for the plants or your family. You wouldn’t want a member of your family nearby picking fruits and veggies for dinner and bumping into it, only to have the whole frame collapse on them.

I am already looking for seeds to use for next year. I found a seed company that is dedicated to non-GMO seeds and plants. They specialize in heirloom seeds, certified organic seeds; they sell poultry as well. The shipping, if you order over $20 worth is free; they stand behind their products and it’s a small family-run business. (No, I am not being paid by them to endorse their products. I do, however, strongly encourage you to look at their huge seed catalog, online.) The Sand Hill Preservation Center catalog has over 1600 rare and genetic seeds that you just won’t find at Wal-Mart or Rural King. I personally like the heirloom produce better. The taste of an heirloom tomato is strong and sweet. The taste hasn’t been bred out of them, in order to last longer on the vine, or to be a brighter color. The online website is http://www.sandhillpreservation.com. I’ve had to call a few times and they are always very friendly and answer any question I have about my garden. I strongly encourage you, before buying your seeds from a chain store and getting seeds that may have been genetically modified, you try some of Sand Hill’s seeds. Many of the seeds are cheaper than Burpee’s and you get more seeds. Get a few friends to get in with you. You’ll save on shipping, you can trade seeds and maybe try some seeds you wouldn’t have known existed. Best of all, you are supporting a family-run company.

Have you held a door for someone today? Maybe waved someone through at a four-way stop? Did you wait patiently while an elderly person slowly wheeled their wagon up to the check-out counter, rather than race past them? Have you started to recycle, if you didn’t do so already? Maybe take your neighbor’s trashcan out on trash day, when they forgot? Read a book aloud to your child? Have you sat down outside with your child for a picnic lunch and just watched to clouds roll by? Maybe as a surprise, serve just watermelon and other fruit for a nice summer dinner? Buy a few burgers and a drink from the dollar menu at McDonalds and hand the sack lunch to a homeless person on the street? Make a person smile today, because tomorrow is not guaranteed. Help someone today, for you never know if you may be the one in need in the future.

Until next time, my friends, I wish you all peace and happiness and a happy harvest!

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