Gardening to save money part 3

Good evening everyone! I hope everyone is doing well and enjoying that springtime has definitely decided to stay. Last Saturday night as I was looking out the window, I saw my first firefly! Yes, spring and warm weather is here!

We have most of our garden in the ground. This means the Roma tomatoes; red cabbage; beets; carrots; radishes; Parris Island Cos lettuce (Parris Island species, because Parris Island is where I was forged into a Marine! Ooh rah!!) and peas. The bush beans, pickling cucumbers and eggplant go in this weekend, as well as my jalapeno and sweet peppers. I just turned over another area, which will be for my pumpkins, the sugar pie kind. In containers, I have rhubarb; red cabbage; red, white and yellow onions (cabbage and onions were grown from stumps or cores) garlic (which I intend to preserve.) I will be sprinkling the seeds for my basil amongst my tomato plants and also marigold seeds. Basil is a companion plant to tomato plants.  Busy, busy, busy!

Potato barrel
Potato barrel
Potato barrel #2
Potato barrel #2
Potato barrel #3
Potato barrel #3
Potato barrel #4
Potato barrel #4
My potato barrels are actually old trashcans
My potato barrels are actually old trashcans

I am not an extremely talented person. My dad isn’t MacGyver and my mom wasn’t the Good Fairy Glenda. I learned all of these gardening things by reading and reading and checking out books, and reading, talking to people (especially ones from other countries, who have methods which aren’t often used here in the States, because it’s easier to do it the usual way.) Some of my methods I am learning as I go and they aren’t working. I adapt. We are on a severely limited income, so many of these ways, besides being fun, re-use items that would usually go into the trash. I love the challenge and to see that my way to get around the problem actually works…well, there is no better feeling. My kids love running to me, “Mommy! Here’s another toilet paper roll! We need it for the garden!” My kids love carrying the outer leaves from the lettuce heads, the carrot tops and cucumber ends from salads we make, in a huge bowl to throw in the compost heap. Old newspapers are laid out over the garden. Grass clippings from when hubby mows the grass, my kids sprinkle over the compost. The stand by and watch as I turn the whole mess over. (I do it the easy way: I use a manure fork and scoopful by scoopful, move it from one spot to another, about three feet away.) Sawdust from all of the wood we are cutting up for firewood is picked up and packed into small buckets for them to run back and forth: fill, run to the compost, sprinkle it, run back to the sawdust pile, re-fill. It’s a task they don’t get tired of.

Last weekend, noticing that my blueberry bush was looking a little reddish, I remembered that reddish leaves show that the soil lacks acid. So, I poured about a half-cup of white vinegar into about a gallon of water, and watered the bush. It looks a bit better now. Still reddish, but the leaves look a bit perkier.

Gardening is a tough job. It’s a labor of love. While everyone is watching television, or playing video games, we are outside pulling weeds; looking up bugs we find in the garden to see if the insect is a “keeper” or a “squasher.” We try to lure beneficial insects to the garden, because I don’t want to use any pesticides. I want to ask YumYum to go out and pick me ten tomatoes, and not worry if he devours two tomatoes, during his mission. I want to pull cherries off of the tree and let my little girl savor the tartness, without saying ” Ooh, no no. We have to wash these first.” I want to enjoy the fruits of our labor and if I have to share some with a few insects, so be it. But my kids are seeing that spraying is not always the answer, especially when insects are becoming more and more immune to the pesticides used, which means we need to develop stronger ones. No, not here. My kids watch me pull apart the tent caterpillar nest and dump the caterpillars into water with a squirt of Dawn dishwashing soap. (I use Dawn for my plants, because it’s environmentally safe.) They see and learn. Our greatest gift we can give our kids is a thirst and desire for learning.

What activity have you done with your child this week? Activity means “active” meaning “interacting” with your child. Play ball? Go for a walk? Pull weeds together? Did you perhaps cook dinner together, with you cooking at the stove while the child sets the table and just talk? How about walk around the house with a garbage bag and collect five items from each room to throw away or donate? They sound like little things, but to a child, they mean the world.

Container gardening
Container gardening
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Gardening to save money Pt 2 (potatoes)

Hello, my friends! I hope you all are well. Hopefully most of us have seen a bit of green in our yard. Yesterday as I was raking, I saw a glimpse of yellow; it was a crocus that had bloomed. I have three that have bloomed, so SPRING IS HERE!! Sure, a winter storm is expected on Sunday, with snow and freezing rain, but I am not concerned. My plants are coming back to life!

First crocus of the year!
First crocus of the year!

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My tulips
My tulips

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I am moving a huge pile of leaves we had in the front yard, to our backyard garden. As I’d mentioned in an earlier posting, we “borrowed” the leaves from several neighbors (with their permission) and had a huge pile in the front for the kids (YumYum, Beaker and my hubby) to play around in. Nothing says “autumn” like a pile of leaves to jump in. Since we had the leaves from three different yards AND ours…well, that’s a lot of leaves. The leaves were crunched up as everyone played in them, then winter and the snow further crunched and composted them, so now I am getting these wet, decaying leaves to cover the garden area with. When we rototill the area, the leaves will be rototilled under the ground. Anyway, I’ve been preparing my list of possible veggies to grow and I’ve been asking hubby if we can grow potatoes. “No, they take up too much room and you can never find all of them. They also eat all of the nutrients.” Fine. No potatoes in the garden. However, what about in a cat food bag?

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cat food bags are woven strips of plastic...very strong.
cat food bags are woven strips of plastic…very strong.

I recently read that potatoes do suck a great deal of nutrients from the ground, and are prone to some diseases, like brown scab. Once you get some types of diseases in the ground, you may as well have salted the area, since you can never grow stuff there again. I would love to grow potatoes, but I am not willing to sacrifice my garden for them. Therefore, I am going to grow them in the plastic bags from my cat food.

I buy the large bags of cat food for my critters. The plastic bags are woven plastic strips…very strong. Now I have read how you can use black trash bags to grow potatoes in, but I think the bags would split open from the weight of the dirt; sticks poking it, etc. I know I have a hard time running to the trashcan outside with a large garbage bag. Also, it seems wasteful to me, to use up plastic garbage bags for this. If you have a pet or a friend who has a pet, ask for their empty plastic food bags. Burlap sacks can be used, feed bags, or any type of sack you have on hand. No sack? If you can get your hands on a few old tires, I have read you can use those. Lay the tire flat on the ground and fill the center with dirt and mulch. Put your seed potatoes in the center and cover. As the potato plant grows, you add another tire on top. Fill it with dirt and more seed potatoes. Keep going until they are four tires high. A word of caution: Numerous online forums state to use your potatoes from the grocery store that have sprouted eyes. I wouldn’t, personally, since those will often be infected with brown scab. Just go get seed potatoes from your store.

How to do it in a cat food bag? Well, first with a sharp pair of scissors, poke numerous holes in the bottom of the bag and about 1/3 of the way up the sides. Not a lot of holes and not huge ones; just to help with drainage. Next, bring the empty bag to the area you plan to grow them at. Do this first, so you don’t fill the bag up, then have to drag it to the area you plan to grow it. Add about six to eight inches of soil and some compost at the bottom of the bag. If using a 22 pound bag, use no more than 3 pieces of seed potato. That’s right…not ten or fifteen as some sites I’ve read stated. Potatoes are greedy little buggers. They will suck the nutrition from other potatoes, to feed themselves. If you get over-ambitious and plant 15 potato pieces in one 30-gallon garbage bag, as I’ve read stated on one particular site, then you will wind up with a handful of potatoes that are the size of a large marble. Just save your large feed bags, and plant two or maybe three PIECES per bag. Roll the bag down, about halfway. Put the dirt and compost in. Lay your seed potato on the six inches of dirt, the side with the most “eyes” or longest “eyes” facing up and gently cover with dirt, for a few inches. Water, but don’t make them soggy. As the plant grows, add more dirt and compost to cover most of the green plant, but leave an inch aboveground. Unroll the bag and continue to fill the bag until you reach about two inches from the top of the bag. Let the plant grow, flower and die off.After the plant itself has died off, dig up the potato, by cutting the sides of the bag and permit the potatoes to dry for a day.

I really want to try this. Several sites have said that potatoes can grow in just straw…no dirt, just straw. Since we have so many dry leaves, I’m going to attempt this with some organic potatoes in my cat food bags. Since beans fix nitrogen in the soil and potatoes drain the soil of nitrogen, I was trying to see if I could plant beans on top of the potato bag, but since the potato has to keep being buried, so it will branch out and create more potatoes, the bean plant would be buried. Bummer.

I will keep you all posted on how this turns out. I am new to much of this gardening, beyond growing tomatoes. On Long Island, where I grew up, many of our dads had a small crop of tomato plants growing in the backyard. Not a lot…maybe three or four plants. Just enough for making sandwiches with or a salad. Here, in Illinois, we are using a garden to offset our grocery bill and summer entertainment for the kids. If I am still unemployed throughout the summer, my kids won’t be attending summer camp, because we cannot afford it, but also, I’ll be home! Why send them away for someone else to watch them? The kids are very psyched up to have such a large garden and are looking rather closely in the grocery stores for vegetables they may like to grow for ourselves. This garden is turning into a learning opportunity for the kids, as well as myself and hubby. This also is bringing us closer, as we all work together, knowing we need each other’s help if we are to get this all done. My son is talking about making sandwiches and selling them with the jams I plan to make with the fruit from our fruit trees and from a local “pick-your-own” farm.

I have enclosed a link for a garden in a bucket, which I found. It looks easy enough and small enough, that even if you just have a fire escape, you can grow veggies for your salad. We have several cat litter buckets, which once the litter is used up, my kids store their blocks or toys in. To discover they can grow their own garden in…well, now that’s pretty nifty. Next week is spring break for my son. We will be gathering our materials then.

Do you have any ideas for small gardens? My family and I don’t spray for bugs, because my son, YumYum and I like to just pick the fruit (or veggie) wipe it off, pick off any bugs and eat it. For slug control (this may sound gross, but the kids loved it) I gave my son a cup. I picked several slugs off my iris plants and placed them into my cup and then poured beer over them to drown them. He and his little sister then carried their cups to me, as they picked the slugs off, and I put them into my cup. We did this each morning before they left for daycare and I went to work. It kept them busy for the last 20 minutes before we left; helped reduce the slug population and they learned about insect control without using dangerous chemicals. I also crushed my eggshells and threw them into the garden. The slugs don’t like to crawl over the eggshells and the birds ate the slugs and eggshells. We did that most of last summer, since the early mornings were so damp, the slugs were really multiplying. Such fun things my kids and I do for cheap entertainment!

Don’t let today pass by without doing something to bring hope to another person’s life. Give a dollar to the donation can at your local gas station; buy a pizza and ask that they deliver it to your local police station or fire station. Buy a dozen doughnuts or bagels and send it to your child’s school office. On a night that you aren’t busy with work, stop by your local library and read aloud a few popular children’s books and record it. Send the recording to your local children’s hospital for children. Buy a bag of dog or cat food and donate it to your local animal shelter. Short on funds? Then volunteer to be a socializer for the animals at the shelter. You get to play with the pets, walk them, feed them, cuddle with them and you don’t have to pay a dime for it. Spend a weekend volunteering at your local food pantry. Donate blood. Donate a smile. Give someone a reason to smile today. Until we meet again, my family and friends, I wish you peace.

DIY coffee starter kits or logs

Good morning my friends! Today I woke up to the wonderful sound of thunder and rain pounding on my bedroom window. What a glorious sound! Spring is coming, people. The days are growing just a bit longer, the temperatures aren’t dipping quite as low (thank goodness for that; our wood pile is nearly gone); we aren’t needing to wear quite as many scarves, hats and gloves as we were a few weeks ago. The trees are beginning to get buds (I purchased several fruit trees and planted them last year. I looked at them a few days ago and saw tiny leaf buds at the end of them. This was a rough winter for many of us…I don’t know when was the last time I greeted Spring with such joy.

Well, as close as Spring is, it’s not quite here yet. This means some of us will still need to use our fireplaces, wood stoves or even fire pits. With the Springtime weather comes a lot of rain and wet logs. I mentioned yesterday how you can use some old candle wax to start a fire easily. Today, I’m going to talk about making coffee ground starter kits, suing materials you would normally just toss out. This is a fun project to do with the kids on rainy days. I wouldn’t have them near the grease or wax when it’s melted, but even little ones can help use a spoon to pack the coffee grounds. Enough teasing you…let’s get this project started!!

DIY Coffee Log or Starter Kit

materials needed:

old, used coffee grounds (you can even use the filter it was used with, for a wick) You can either use ones that you have saved, or stop by your local coffee shop, like Starbucks or Panera Bread Company. Just ask for the used coffee grounds; they are more than happy to give the used ones away. You’ll need about 4-6 cups of grounds.

wax leftover from candles (or use fresh candles, broken crayons, Gulf wax for canning etc) You’ll need about a 8 oz of wax to make one log. If you do not have wax, used cooking grease will work just as well. It does not need to be melted for as long, however, in the oven.

a few tablespoons of corn syrup, or molasses or maple syrup (this is to help bind the material together.)

An old bread loaf pan, or other oven-safe baking pan; preferably in the shape of a loaf, for the mold. A cake pan can be used as well, if you do not have a loaf pan handy. It just needs to be about an inch or more, deep. If you do not have a bread loaf pan, then you can use large soup cans or a large metal coffee can.

First, spread the used coffee grounds on a cookie sheet with raised edges; take the wax and chop it into large chunks. Put the wax into an oven safe pan to melt. You can use old soup cans to melt the wax in as well, or a metal oven-safe mixing bowl. Drizzle the syrup or molasses onto the wax. If using grease, just pile the grease into a deep oven-safe bowl or oven-safe dish.

Place the coffee grounds and the wax into an oven. Turn the oven to about 150-200 deg F and let the grounds dry out thoroughly. Stir the grounds every once in a while. It will take about 30-45 min for the grounds to dry, depending on how wet they were when you first put them into the oven. If using grease, you want it at the point it just starts to melt, not at the bubbling stage. If using grease, put the bowl into the oven at the last five or so minutes, before you take the dried coffee grounds out.

When the wax is completely melted, stir the syrup and wax mixture. Use a metal spoon, not a plastic one, since the plastic one will melt. Add about a half-cup of coffee grounds to the wax mixture and stir. Keep adding the grounds and stirring until the grounds are completely incorporated. It may bubble a bit, but that is the moisture in the coffee grounds reacting to the hot syrup. Scoop the grounds-wax mixture into the pan using a large metal spoon until the pan is about half-way full. Fold the dried, used filters in half and pack the grounds around it, so that a piece of the filter remains visible. Several of the filters can be used for this. These are your wicks. Keep adding the grounds-wax mixture to the loaf pan. When the pan is nearly full, using the back of your spoon, pack the coffee grounds into the pan, so there are no air gaps. You can also use a piece of waxed paper to lay over the top and using the heel of your hand, pack the grounds into the loaf pan, making sure to pack the corners. Once the coffee mixture is good and packed, let the pan sit out  for 24 hours or at least overnight.

After the grounds have set, using a plastic spatula, scrape the edges of the loaf pan to separate the “log” from the pan. You may have to put a dishcloth underneath it and bang it on the counter a few times to encourage the “log” to release it’s grip. Once it is free, you can use it in your fireplace or wood stove. Put some smaller logs around it, light the coffee filter wicks and enjoy! It may not last for two or so hours, but it’s enough to help get a fire started and start drying out the wood you put into the fireplace.

For a DIT starter kit, you will need:

wax (like leftover scraps of candles, crayons about 3 oz of wax is needed, or the equivalent of around 24 crayons) or a few ounces of used cooking grease.

used coffee grounds (about 2 cups)

a few tablespoons of corn syrup, maple syrup or molasses (as a binding agent)

a cardboard egg carton (if none is handy, you can use a muffin tin with paper muffin cups. You can also use custard cups and use the filter as the paper cup holder.

First, spread the coffee grounds on a cookie sheet with edges, just as you would to make a log. In an oven-safe baking dish, or a metal soup can, drizzle the corn syrup over the wax. Place the grounds and the wax into the oven and heat the oven to about 200 deg F for about 35-40 min, stirring the grounds occasionally. If using grease, put the grease and syrup into a deep oven-safe mixing bowl or deep oven-safe pan and put into the oven to melt for the last five minutes, until you remove the grounds from the oven. You don’t want the grease bubbling, just at the point it starts to liquify.

Once the wax is melted and the grounds are dry, mix the coffee grounds with the wax-syrup (or grease-syrup) mixture. Fold the dried coffee filter in half and then again in half. Put the lower part of the folder coffee filter into the first egg-holder of the carton and using a metal spoon, pack the grounds around the filter, keeping the top part exposed. The coffee filter edges are the wick.

coffee filter fire starter

If you are using a muffin tin and paper cups, or the coffee filter itself to contain the grounds, do not fill the cup up all of the way. Other items I have used:

empty cardboard toilet paper tubes which I’d cut in half, so they are short tubes. Stand the tubes up in a muffin tin, or pack them tightly into a cake pan, so they are all standing. Put a small wad of newspaper into each tube and push it down. This will act as a plug on one end. Fill the toilet paper tubes up with the coffee ground-wax mixture, packing the mixture down. Do not fill it all of the way, so the edge of the cardboard tube will act like a wick.

If you use the cardboard egg carton, fill each compartment of the egg carton, packing down the grounds-wax mixture. Allow the grounds mixture to dry overnight.

When a fire is needed, you can break off one of the egg carton plugs, or use a muffin cup or toilet paper roll. Light the coffee filter wick (or edge of the paper or cardboard roll) and place into your fire pit (or fire place, wood stove, campfire, etc.) You may need to use two or three plugs. Add the branches as needed, until you have a fire going.

So now you have it! A way that items that are normally going into our landfill (or composting, as I usually do) are being used further. THAT’S being frugal. My husband says he likes to “pinch a penny until Abe Lincoln screams for mercy,” and that is exactly what we do here in this house. Even throw-away items are recycled (and sometimes our recyclables are recycled, lol.)

So, now that I showed you a few ways to save money by using the “trash” you have around your house, tomorrow we can look at how we can start to organize our house, our mind and our finances. Don’t worry, it’s not as bad as it sounds. You know why? We are going to get each other through each day, TOGETHER. You are not alone in this world. Even when you feel like you have nowhere to turn, there is a way out of the dark tunnel. It won’t be night-time forever. The sun will come up…don’t you want to see the sun rise? Even if you can’t find a smile for yourself, find one to give to another…they may have one they can lend you. Tell the lady behind you she can go ahead of you on the line at the grocery store. Give your significant other an extra big kiss, before bed tonight. If your other half is deployed or working late or traveling, then jot a few kind words down on a Post-It note to give to them when they return, or in the next care package you send them. Check with a local underprivileged elementary school and see if you can donate a few boxes of crayons and construction paper, which you can pick up cheaply, at the dollar store. When sitting at a four-way stop, wave to the cars around you to go ahead of you. Walk around the house and grab 5 items you haven’t used in the past month, put them into a bag and drop off at your local Goodwill. Get five articles of clothing you haven’t worn in 6 months, or your children no longer like or fit and donate it. Call or text someone and just say, “I was thinking of you today.” Locate three happy news stories and send them to people who you think need a smile. Put on some music that makes you tap your feet, thump your desk and shimmy in your seat. We will get through our rough times together. We all live and breathe under the same sun, moon and stars, big and small, great and tall. Until next time, dear friends…PEACE!!

DIY bird suet

Good morning, friends! This morning in Illinois, it’s a balmy 30 degrees outside. I am used to working outside, so to me, this is t-shirt and shorts weather. I ran outside to go feed a few stray cats that come over each morning and stood on the porch in my t-shirt and relished in the thought that spring will be here soon…I hope. Well, within 15 minutes of putting out two bowls of Purina cat chow, the starlings and grackles found the bowls and were freaking out and fighting over the food. Apparently their suet feeder was empty again (the other one is still MIA; apparently a raccoon decided to make a five-finger discount and run off with the whole darn suet cage.) Anyway, I buy the cages at the dollar store and make my own suet so it’s not a big deal. This past Christmas, my son, YumYum, hubby and I also made pine cone bird feeders for our feathered friends. Today’s post will give you directions about how to feed your friends, which gives the family some free entertainment and lots of laughs, as well as it can be educational, as you try and identify all the birds that arrive at your feeding station.

DIY suet for birds

about a gallon of grease, lard, Crisco, etc. I usually save all the grease from the year from my cooking. I let it cool down in the pan after I remove the main parts of my food (little stuck-on bits of food are fine, since it will all be going into a freezer.) After your grease from making hamburgers, bacon, grease from chicken soup, making pot roast etc cools, I use a spatula and scrape it all into an old plastic peanut butter container. If you have an old Crisco container, or an old coffee container, that will work fine as well. Throughout the year, as you cook, just scrape the cooled grease into the container. Keep it in the freezer, so it doesn’t spoil. If you don’t have an excess of grease, then just use Crisco.

about a cup of cornmeal

optional: a few tablespoons of peanut butter

stale peanuts or sunflower seeds

leftover crumbs of cereal (you know the crumbs at the bottom of the Trix, corn flakes, Rice Krispies, etc bags as well as any loose cereal rolling around between the box and the bag.

A few cups of bird seed (doesn’t need to be high quality bird seed, just ensure it is pesticide free. (Not all bird seeds are pesticide-free; Scotts Miracle-Gro was fined $12.5 million for illegally applying insecticides to its bird seed. The insecticides are toxic to birds. http://www.audubonmagazine.org/articles/blog/pesticides-bird-seed-scotts-miracle-gro-fined-125-million.) I use Wagoner’s Four Season Wild Bird Food. It can be ordered from Amazon $11.98 for a 20 pound bag, and if you are an Amazon Prime member, shipping is free. However, you can use any kind you want, I just ask that you skip the seed you find at the dollar store. They are full of red millet, which is a throw-away seed for many birds and probably treated with an insecticide to prevent boll weevils during storage.

Any leftover cooked vegetables or even thawed frozen veggies (have any peas or corn that is freezer burned? Leftover macaroni or spaghetti that was found in the back of the fridge and you’re not sure how long it’s been there? As long as there is no mold on the food. So as you find leftover cooked rice, baked potatoes, dried out pieces of hard cheese, like Swiss, muenster, Colby, etc. Do not use soft cheese such as cream cheese or brie.) Chop the veggies, or pasta up into small pieces. If it has sauce, such as Alfredo or tomato sauce, rinse them them off, before chopping up the pasta or veggies.

optional: Washed and crushed eggshells (yes, this sounds weird, but any eggs that I use, I will smash the eggshells up in a strainer with small holes and rinse the eggshells off. Do not use soap!! Just rinse with warm water and mash the shells up with your hands. After they are washed, spread them out on a cookie sheet and put into a warmed oven (heat the oven to 200 deg for about 5 minutes, then turn off the oven. Put the eggshells in the warmed oven, and let them dry for about 12 hours. If you don’t have time to dry them, then that’s fine also. The eggshells add much-needed calcium to the birds for strong eggs. In the springtime, I grind up all my eggshells and toss them into the garden. Not only will the birds eat them, they are a natural deterrent to slugs and snails, because the eggshells have sharp edges, which will cut open the soft gastropods’ bodies and they will dry out.

about a cup of plain uncooked oatmeal; rolled oats or steel oats are fine. Cooked oatmeal will also work. I often scrape the bits leftover from my kids’ oatmeal bowl into my grease can and re-freeze it.

optional: dried fruit, such as raisins, prunes, Craisins, dried apple pieces, etc. I often take the apple cores from apples I cut up for me kids, chop them up, seeds and all and toss them into the freezer in small baggies or add directly to my container of grease.

optional: about 4 T or more of cayenne pepper or hot pepper flakes (birds are not bothered by the cayenne pepper or chili powder flakes, as long as it is actually mixed up in the suet and not sprinkled on top of bird seed. The cayenne pepper is to deter squirrels and other rodents. If you don’t mind tossing the crazy antics of squirrels, you don’t need to add the cayenne.)

First, heat a large pot of water to almost boiling. This is to heat the grease up slightly by placing the container it was stored in, into the large pot of very hot water. Do not put the pot of hot water with the grease container on the stove. Let the grease melt until it is almost a slurry. You don’t need it to be completely melted…just until it is the consistency of peanut butter. Scrape the grease out and put it into a large bowl. Add the peanut butter and stir to mix. Add the cayenne pepper and mix thoroughly. Then add the birdseed, rolled oats, peanuts or sunflower seeds, dried fruit and crushed egg shells. If the temperature outside for the next several days will be below freezing, you can add the mixed, thawed veggies, rice or pasta. Once it is all mixed up, scrape the suet mixture into a cookie tin or even an ice cube tray. I prefer using a silicone muffin tray, since it’s easier for me to pull my suet muffins out. Put the suet muffins into the freezer for at least 12 hours. After frozen, remove your suet muffins and add to your suet cage. If you don’t have a suet cage, you can smear the soft mixture onto pine cones which you have already tied a long piece of yarn to, then pile the suet-smeared pine cones into a 5 gallon bucket with a lid. I do the pine cones in the winter, when snow is expected. I put the filled bucket, with the lid on tightly and store outside on my porch. After the snow stops, I will remove the lid and tie the pine cones up in the trees for the birds. If you don’t have cages or pine cones, you can also save the netting to the bags of potatoes or onions. Cut the top of the net bag and remove your produce. Find a container that will fit the open net bag. Put the net bag inside the container and open it up. Take the top part and wrap it around the top of the container, using a rubber band to secure it.

onion netbag suet mommy blog

Ensure the container has a wide-mouth at the top, so it’s easy to remove. Then lay the container on it’s side, so the net bag is laying against the container and scrape some of your suet into the bag. Do not overfill it. After a few spoonfuls, you may need to put the net bag into the freezer to stiffen the mixture up some. Add more grease until the bag is full, re-freezing it as needed, so the suet doesn’t dribble through the net bag. Tie off the top and hang outside on a strong branch. The birds will love you for this; it’s cheap (since you are using basically leftovers and stuff normally thrown into the garbage, with exception of buying the birdseed, it’s practically free) and you are helping others who are are also struggling to feed themselves.

This may sound like a lot of work, but it actually goes together pretty fast. Most of the time is actually hands-off, because it is in the freezer. Do not make this when the temperatures are expected to be over 45 degrees, since the suet will melt and possible go rancid. Don’t make more than can be consumed in about four or five days, unless the temps remain below freezing or you keep extra in your freezer. This is a nice rainy-day or snow day project for you and your kids to do. I try to keep my old Crisco containers (they don’t even need to be washed free of the grease, since you are only adding more, and as the family uses up cereal, or I find one tablespoon of food saved in the refrigerator which I find and question when it was put put in the fridge, I add it to the Crisco container in the freezer. The items don’t even to be added separately. If you add bits and pieces through out the year, you can just thaw it out in the double boiler method until it is a slurry and just spoon it directly into your muffin tins and re-freeze. If you use metal tins, to easily remove your suet muffins, take the frozen tin and submerge the bottom part into a pan of hot water. Do not get the tops wet. Just heat the tin part until the suet muffins or suet cubes (if using an old ice cube tray) until they are easy to remove.

Remember to do a good deed for another today. A simple gesture like telling a military person, “Thank you for serving,” regardless if you believe in the war or not. Dropping your spare change into a collection container for stray animals at the gas station. Collecting old blankets or towels and dropping them off at a local animal shelter. Even stopping at the dollar store and purchasing two or three cans of wet cat food and leaving them at the adoption desk that PetSmart and PetCo. have every weekend. There are always others that have it worse than you. By doing a little something to brighten up another’s day, you make this world a happier place. Even go the the dollar store and buy a bottle of shampoo or a few bars of soap and leave them at your local food pantry. Have some soap a relative gave you at Christmas or birthday that you don’t like the scent of? If they are unopened, drop them off at the food pantry. Even if you don’t like it, someone else may love it. We all need a helping hand and it gives us such a good feeling knowing we are helping another person, feathered or furry critter a helping hand. Have you made someone smile today?